Hottest, Driest and Lowest National Park

hottest driest park

We’ve been doing these mystery destination games for months but this week we’ve reached an all time low. Take a look at the photo and read the five clues below. If you know the name of the outdoor mystery destination that we are talking about enter the name in the comments. In recent weeks the answer has been a mountain, a river, a reservoir and a state park. This week the correct answer is the name of a national park.

  • The world record hottest air temperature of 134 degrees Fahrenheit was recorded in this park. In July 1913, five consecutive days of 129°F or above were recorded making this the hottest place on Earth.
  • Despite warm dry conditions, there is a lot of plant diversity within this park. In fact, the park is home to more than 1000 species of plants and more than 50 of those are endemics, found nowhere else in the world.
  • You can find colorful badlands, snow-covered peaks, beautiful sand dunes, salt flats and rugged canyons.
  • Popular activities include sight-seeing, motorcycle touring, off-road driving, mountain biking, hiking, camping and stargazing.
  • The lowest elevation point in North America is in this park. This point is only 85 miles away from a 14,505 foot peak making it the largest elevation gradient in the United States.
Hot and dry national park

Photo by Tom Babich

Do you know what national park we are talking about? Have you ever visited this area? When was the last time? Enter the name of this national park in the comments below then forward this mystery destination to a friend to see if they know the answer.

Think you know it all? Try these other mystery destinations.

A tower makes a great national monument
Canyons, Ridges and Buttes
Mountain, Beaches and Tidepools
Giant Trees and a Huge Peak

Most visited National Park

Andy HawbakerArticle By: Andy Hawbaker (409 Posts)

I love hiking, backpacking, snowboarding and exploring the Rocky Mountains and beyond with my wife and kids. When I'm not on the trail, I share my adventures here on the Sierra SocialHub. If you have something you'd like to share with the community let me know at pr@sierratradingpost.com.

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